AF’s Weblog

September 17, 2012

Motu Track16 Review

To read the full detailed review with sound samples see:  MOTU Track16 Review

Track16 is the latest addition to Motu’s range of audio interfaces. The numerous features announced by the manufacturer are very appealing. Let’s see how they translate in the real world!

How Does it Sound?

MOTU Track16MOTU Track16

 

Test system

MacBook Pro QuadCore i7 2.7 GHz
OS 10.6.8
Motu Track 16
Motu CueMix FX 1.6 52865
Logic Pro 9.1.7

 

MOTU Track16

MOTU Track16

Let’s make a first attempt with a Cort Jumbo acoustic guitar (thanks to Nico for his guitars and his presence in front of the mic!) captured by a TLM-103, a mic with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Note that you can’t achieve max gain via the control on the interface itself and once you close the window (for example to get free space on your screen), there is nothing on the interface to recall CueMix…

Now let’s have a listen…

Conclusion

MOTU Track16Let’s start with the negatives, for example the bulky and rigid D-Sub cable that takes a lot of space on a table or mixer. That’s certainly a pity for a product sold as a desktop interface. Moreover, sometimes there are audio clicks and I was not able to find the reason why (except when you power on/off). The main drawback is the buzz followed by clicks when you increase the trim setting of the Hi-Z inputs. The quality of the mic preamps equals the quality of similar interfaces at the same price-point. You’ll be able to work without constraints, even if the preamps don’t quite reach the performance of the ones on comparable RME or TC interfaces. However, an ideal solution would be to add an external preamp via the ADAT interface.

Putting that aside, this audio interface offers many advantages. First of all, the number of ins/outs and the way they can be managed from the interface itself. The construction seems pretty sturdy, which is reassuring, especially considering that in this price range you can find several plastic boxes with knobs that fall off… The software is quite impressive, even if it lacks some features, like a real routing matrix for example. Nonetheless, the eight buses, high-quality effects, measurement tools, SMPTE LTC sync, the possibility to save setup presets, etc. make the combination of CueMix FX and Track16 a very useful tool.

Advantages: 
  • Perfect construction
  • Impeccable “toggle display” function
  • Quality converters
  • Immediate mute of the current channel by pushing the knob
  • Excellent display features
  • 32-bit, floating-point internal processing
  • Powerful and effective CueMix FX software
  • Zero-latency monitoring
  • Working with a 32-sample buffer size is not a problem
  • Perfect design
  • Quality of the effects
  • Eight independent mixing buses
  • SMPTE (LTC) sync via single 1/4″ jack
  • Audiodesk 3 included
  • 24 bits/192 kHz
  • ADAT S/Mux

Drawbacks:

  • Audio clicks from time to time and when powering on/off
  • Strange behavior (buzz and clicks) of the Hi-Z Trim controls without a signal present
  • Floor-noise of the preamps is a bit high
  • No real routing matrix
  • ADAT switching system not always reliable
  • D-Sub cable: too rigid and without color marks

To read the full detailed review with sound samples see:  MOTU Track16 Review

May 7, 2012

Universal Audio Apollo Review

To read the full detailed article see:  Universal Audio Apollo Review

Universal Audio is a brand like no other in the pro audio world. The company has been competing in the hardware market for over 50 years with preamps, compressors and channel strips. But it has also been present in the plug-in market for about a decade with the famous UAD DSP platform. We have always wondered what would happen if Universal Audio were to combine their analog and digital technologies. Introduced at the NAMM 2012, the Apollo is the first answer. Focus on the Universal Audio interface!

… one giant leap for DSP technology!

We have often asked ourselves why a manufacturer offering high-quality preamps, hardware compressors and plug-ins never conceived a product including all this know-how. They have finally done it with the Apollo, a digital audio interface with four preamps and the famous UAD-2 DSP. We dreamed about an audio interface with a Twin-Finity preamp or even a 1176LN (hardware), but Universal Audio decided to focus on digital audio and to allow the user to work with UAD plug-ins like with classic analog gear. To achieve that, the engineer team developed a system that allows to decrease the latency to less than 2 ms — a bit like Pro Tools HD does —, giving the musician and sound engineer the possibility to process the signal directly during recording sessions. Since the latency time is imperceptible, the musician can play freely and record without any hassles.

Look after your musician

Universal Audio Apollo

Some of you might have doubts about processing the signal during a recording session when using a fully digital system. A couple of decades ago, when recording studios were analog, it was usual to process the signal during recording, for example by inserting a compressor or an EQ in the signal path. Back then plug-ins didn’t exist and the number of compressors and EQs available in the studio was limited. So it was usual to insert processors during takes, even if it meant taking risks and artistic decisions on the spot: there was no other choice! This way of working is still used in modern production environments where some engineers like to take risks and insert hardware compressors and/or EQs during the recording. However, we could ask ourselves whether this workflow makes any sense within a fully digital system. In fact, plug-ins always process the signal after the AD converter. As a consequence, a compressor plug-in won’t be able to reduce the risk of clipping at the converter stage. The same applies to EQs: why should we use destructive processing during the recording, while digital audio technology gives us the possibility to record the settings and edit them later? Modern sequencers give us this chance — it would be a pity not take advantage of it!

Universal Audio Apollo

But inserting plug-ins during the takes can have other advantages. To record a singer you can use a dedicated bus for his monitor headphone mix with the sequencer return and the voice of the singer captured by the microphone in front of him. We all know that musicians need to feel comfortable to perform at their best. When a musician plays well, 50% of your work is already done! That’s the reason why you have to look after the musician: offer him a cup of tee at the right temperature, a bowl of M&Ms without the brown ones, or a flattering sound in his headphones. The Universal Audio interface allows you to insert up to four plug-ins into the channel of the musician/singer with less than 2 ms latency time (1.1ms @ 96kHz, from the analog input to the analog output) and to assign the recorded signal to the monitor headphones adding a bit of compression, a flattering EQ setting and a whiff of reverb so that the musician feels like he’s playing in his favorite cathedral. This can seem superfluous, but it isn’t. The performance of the musician has a direct impact on the final quality of the recording.

But let’s have a look at our all-gray Apollo.

Conclusion

The Apollo was eagerly awaited by many Universal Audio fans and home studio owners — and we must admit that it’s a great achievement! The manufacturer offers you the possibility to insert its famous plug-ins with a latency of less than 2ms, which is more than enough for recording applications. The look and the manufacturing quality are perfect. The mixer is very practical and easy to use. When it comes to audio, the interface offers good quality converters and pretty linear preamps considering the price. We only regret that the mixer is still limited (in the number of Aux buses, for example), that the Thunderbolt option is too expensive and that the interface offers no MIDI or USB connections. But as soon as the plug-ins are available in 64 bits, the interface supports Windows and the mixer offers a couple more features, the Apollo package will be nearly perfect. The user will still have to decide if he “marries” the UAD platform, which forces him to stay faithful to the brand’s plug-ins, otherwise the advantages of the Apollo are limited. But considering the overall quality of the UAD plug-ins, this forced marriage might quickly become a perfect match!

Advantages:
  • Good quality converters
  • Transparent-sounding preamps
  • Less than 2ms latency with inserted plug-ins!
  • One UAD-2 under the hood
  • Nice design
  • High quality construction
  • Simple and easy-to-use mixer
Drawbacks:
  • No MIDI connectors
  • Only FireWire support
  • Thunderbolt option too expensive
  • Currently, only two AUXs in the mixer
  • No Windows support yet
  • No 64 bit plug-ins yet

To read the full detailed article see:  Universal Audio Apollo Review

January 11, 2012

Roland Quad Capture Review

Filed under: audio interface — Tags: , , — audiofanzine @ 3:33 pm

Do you want a small sound card with a high quality sound, clever features, a good construction, and an affordable price? If you do, follow me to give Roland’s Quad Capture a try. If you need even more, follow me too because Roland has something in store for you.

When it comes to audio interfaces, if you ask for renown manufacturers you’ll hear many brand names but probably not Roland.

The brand’s visibility is rather low in this market segment where it used to go under the name Edirol until a couple of years ago. Edirol audio interfaces were no “reference products” but offered a rather good value for money for beginners. Its audio quality didn’t quite meet professional standards. However, Roland has the knowhow for professional audio products: just consider the V-System digital live mixers sold under the brand name RSS (Roland System Solution).

So why not put RSS’ technology into a Roland sound card? That’s what Roland did with the Quad Capture… And it worked!

Description

Roland Quad Capture

The Quad Capture is a 4×4-channel audio interface with 2 analog plus 2 digital inputs and outputs.

Both analog inputs are on XLR/TRS combo connectors, while the line outputs are on balanced 1/4″ jacks. All digital ins and outs are on coaxial connectors. You also get a 1/4″ headphones out.

If we do the math, we have 4 input channels but how many output channels? 2 analog line-level output channels + 2 analog headphones channels + 2 digital output channels = 6 output channels, right?

Unfortunately not! Like the Duo and Tri interfaces, the headphones out doesn’t use dedicated channels, but rather the main output signal is just split inside the hardware to feed both outs. The monitoring quality doesn’t seem to be affected by this. However, in use it can become a bit annoying.

Add a pair of MIDI ins/outs and you get a full overview of the available connections. Surprisingly it lacks ADAT connectors, but considering the price…

Roland Quad Capture

All this is packed in a 19″ half rack typical for 4×4 sound cards. The housing is made out of black metal except for the plastic front plate — and it looks nice. The rounded edges and the chrome binding surrounding the front panel give the unit a sleek but classy look. The big chrome BTR screws give it a professional touch. Considering its light weight (1.26 lbs, it seems that the metal sheet used for the housing is quite thin. But it is made out of aluminum instead of iron, which increases rigidity while decreasing weight. Thus, you can easily fit this sound card together with your laptop inside a (large) carry bag.

Moreover, the quality of the controls and buttons is pretty good. The same applies to the LED indicators on the front plate.

The rear switches are the only negative aspect. These small plastic switches feel quite cheap — the low price doesn’t come without compromises.

However, the quality of the switches is not the main problem, it is the functions they are assigned to.

The Quad looks nice and provides a quality feel that is very different from the abundant plastic products in this price range that try very hard to look pro. Pro musicians or sound engineers won’t be ashamed to take it out of their bags for a session.

Now let’s take a closer look….

Conclusion

If this audio interface had different audio channels for the main and headphones output, I would award it with the “Top Value” Award. In spite of the few cons detected, this audio interface is well built, offers MIDI and digital connections, low-latency operation and premium audio quality for only $270 —easily worth a “Value for Money” Award.

If your are seduced by the premium audio quality but need more connections, give the Octa Capture a chance — my first choice if I had to change my RME Multiface.

Advantages: 
  • Build and look
  • Sound quality
  • Amazing Auto-Sens function
  • Ground lift
  • No additional power supply
  • Price
Drawbacks:
  • Speakers and headphones share he same analog channels
  • Average-quality switches on the rear panel
  • No phantom power indicator
  • No ADAT connectors

To read the full detailed review see:  Roland Quad Capture Review

 

August 28, 2011

Apogee Duet 2 Review

About four years ago, Apogee launched a digital audio FireWire interface called Duet that offered two analog ins and outs. In the meantime, competitors have brought out some very interesting products, especially RME with its attractive Babyface. The brand with the violet logo couldn’t keep its arms crossed so they launched an improved version 2. The verdict?

The FireWire format, which disappeared from the MacBook some time ago only to reappear a few months later, seemed not to convince Apogee. Since the interfaces of this manufacturer are only compatible with Apple computers, they depend on the decisions of Steve Jobs and his friends. That’s why Apogee decided to change its strategy and add a USB controller to its compact interface One. The Duet 2 we review today went the same path — USB instead of FireWire. Is it the only change? No, but before we go any further let’s start unpacking the new Duet.

Unpacking

Apogee Duet 2

Let’s say it like it is: the Duet 2 impressed us as soon as we unpacked it. It looks very nice, professional and rugged. It is miles away from the plastic-looking One and it looks more modern and classy than the Babyface. In summary, it looks great and reliable, a bit like Apple computers… As for the weight and dimensions, the Duet is a bit bigger and heavier than the RME Babyface — its main competitor —, even if the difference is minor.

Along with the interface came a breakout cable with the mic/instrument inputs on big (huge!) XLR and 1/4″ TRS combo connectors, as well as outputs on 1/4″ TRS jacks for your speakers. A small aluminum box is available if you want XLR outputs and separate mic and instrument inputs. Why? For a more convenient fixed installation. Price? €81.33, VAT incl. It’s up to you…

 

Apogee Duet 2

On the front of the interface you’ll find a handy headphones out; The rear side includes a connector for the breakout cable, a USB port and the power connection. An external PSU is also provided but we didn’t use it since our MacBook Pro was powerful enough to feed the Duet 2. The interface has only the essential connections: neither digital nor MIDI ins/outs… A pity considering that the Babyface does have them.

Now let’s take a closer look…

Conclusion

Among high-end mobile interfaces, the Apogee Duet 2 has some important advantages against competitors, like its looks, the manufacturing quality, the OLED display, the soft limiter, and the quality of the preamps and converters. On the other hand, the interface has neither digital nor MIDI ins/outs and provides no processing facilities (EQ, reverb) while some others (e.g. the Babyface) do offer these features for the same price. Moreover, PC users won’t have the possibility to use the Duet 2 — typical Apogee. These are many cons but some Mac users will be seduced by the simplicity of the Maestro software.

Advantages:

  • Manufacturing quality
  • Nice design
  • Audio quality of the preamps and converters
  • USB powered
  • Great OLED display
  • Convenient encoder
  • Soft limiter
  • Maestro’s ease of use

Drawbacks:

  • Supports only Mac computers
  • Big XLR connectors on the breakout cable
  • No processing (EQ, reverb)
  • No digital in/out
  • No MIDI in/out

To read the full detailed review see:  Apogee Duet 2 Review

July 11, 2011

AVID Mbox Pro Review

Filed under: audio interface — Tags: , , , , , , — audiofanzine @ 10:37 am

AVID, formerly Digidesign, took advantage of last year’s re-branding to present the third generation of its digital audio budget interfaces: the Mbox series. Today, we’ll give the Mbox Pro a try, the biggest member of the family.

For many years, Mbox interfaces were the entrance ticket to Pro Tools and were an essential tool for home studio owners who wanted to use the famous Digidesign (now AVID) platform. But things have changed a lot recently and now Pro Tools 9 can be used with any digital audio interface. The Mbox series also changed. Even if they already supported other sequencers in the past, they can now be used (and more than ever) with other programs like Cubase, Logic and company. However, the link between Pro Tools and the Mbox is still very strong, especially in terms of some very appealing bundles. Let’s start by unpacking the Mbox Pro.

 

Out of the Box

AVID Mbox Pro

Inside the nice black box with the AVID logo is the interface itself, which makes a good impression at first sight. The design is very appealing, professional but not austere. It looks quite sturdy due to the fact that it has a metal housing and not less due to its heaviness (6.2 lb!). With such a weight, you can be sure it wont slip down from your desk! The dimensions are also generous: 13.7″ x 7.6″ x 2.3″. The knobs are made out of plastic but seem quite rugged. The look of the new Mbox generation is pretty convincing. AVID did a very nice job compared to former versions. However, mobile sound freaks will find that the weight and bulky dimensions of the Mbox Pro are no advantage. In that case we recommend the Mbox and Mbox Mini, which are lighter and ought to be enough if you don’t need many ins/outs. However, it’s important to point out that the three interfaces don’t have the same specs (S/N ratio, dynamic range, etc.), so the differences between the three models are not limited to the number of connections.

Now, let’s have a look at the front and rear panels…

Panels

AVID Mbox Pro

On the well-equipped rear panel you have six analog outs and four analog ins on 1/4″ TRS jacks with switchable +4dBu/-10dBV sensitivity. You also get four inserts on 1/4″ TRS jacks. The inserts are placed between the preamp and the A/D converter in the signal path. The effect send and return are in the same TRS jack (tip=send, ring=return, sleeve=ground). You also get a stereo Aux input on RCAs or minijack. On the right corner there are two mic inputs (3 and 4) on XLR connectors, while on the left corner you have a pair of FireWire ports. Notice that the interface must be connected to its external PSU because it cannot be powered via the FireWire bus of the computer. A 1/4″ footswitch jack will allow you to punch in and out while recording or start playing back audio — very practical! Finally, a D-Sub port provides you with a MIDI in/out on 5-pin DIN connectors, a coaxial S/PDIF connector and a BNC to feed it a wordclock signal using the provided breakout cable. The only regret of the connections is the lack of an ADAT connector!

AVID Mbox Pro

The front panel is also very comprehensive: a pair of XLR/TRS combos for mic inputs 1 and 2 and the two instrument inputs. They all have two switches: the first one to switch between the front inputs 1/2 (mic and instrument) and the two rear line inputs, and the second one to activate the soft limiter (which is a very rare feature on interfaces in this price range). Also notice that all four gain controls are push/pull pots allowing you to activate -20dB pads. In the middle of the front panel, you’ll find four meters with eight-LEDs each. Nice! Next to the meters, there are two buttons: the first one can be assigned to different Pro Tools functions (we already mentioned that the link between the house’s own hardware and software is still strong!) while the other one allows you to turn the 48V phantom power on/off.

You also get two fully independent headphones outputs: they are assigned to different channels and have their own volume control. Sweet! On the right corner you’ll find a big volume control as well as three keys assigned to the master out: a Dim/Mute switch that allows you to cut or decrease the volume of the main output, a Mono switch, and a Speaker button to toggle between three pairs of monitor speakers connected to the analog outs on the rear panel. Once again: very nice!

Now, let’s talk about the software…

Conclusion

The new Mbox Pro interface is a success: it offers a very nice design, it is robust, provides very comprehensive connections, and includes an easy-to-use virtual mixer. Add the effect section and you get a very appealing audio interface, even if it is not perfect. In fact, we missed an ADAT in/out and some additional effects like an EQ and/or a compressor. Moreover, the weight and the size of this interface are not that convenient for mobile recording.

 

When it comes to software, although the system worked perfectly with Cubase, we recommend to use it with Pro Tools for several reasons. First, the convenient Multi button you can assign to different functions, but especially because of the Pro Tools 9 bundles that can save you up to $200 on the sequencer price (the Mbox Pro alone costs $729 and only $999 with Pro Tools 9). Users of other sequencers might want to check competitor products that provide more features for the same price. But if you are looking for a high-quality audio interface and want to start working with Pro Tools 9 without spending a lot of money, the Mbox range is the way to go.

Advantages:

  • Sturdy
  • Nice design
  • Comprehensive analog connections
  • Good sounding preamps and converters
  • Virtual mixer
  • Integrated reverb and delay effects
  • Appealing bundle price with Pro Tools 9

Drawbacks:

  • A bit expensive without bundle
  • Heavy and bulky
  • No ADAT connection
  • No EQ nor compressor in the FX section

To read the full detailed article see:  Avid MBox Pro Review

December 8, 2010

RME Babyface Review

Most manufacturers have been adding compact audio interfaces to their product range for several years, and now is time for RME and its Babyface. Many mobile musicians and sound engineers have been eagerly waiting for this new USB2 compatible interface…

This end of year is full of new launches at RME: the high-end Fireface UFX (already reviewed by AudioFanzine) and the Babyface, which belongs to the affordable line of RME products. The word “affordable” is relative, of course, considering that the Babyface’s price tag is nearly $750… However, the Babyface is the German manufacturer’s most compact and affordable external interface and it will surely appeal to mobile home-studio owners searching for quality.

Inside the box you’ll find the user’s manual, a breakout cable and an extension cable to add inputs and outputs to the Babyface (see below), a USB2 cable, a nice transport bag to carry the interface, the cables and a mic (for example), and the Babyface itself with its blue and gray finish. The interface is quite compact (3.9″ x 1″ x 6.3″) but it is heavy enough (1.1 lb.) to sit stably on your desk — it feels sturdy. This impression is reinforced by the metal housing with the typical RME blue finish. Only the knobs and the jog wheel are made out of plastic. The wheel doesn’t seem to be too tough; the first few months of intensive use will show if it has what is takes…

Plug-in Baby

RME Audio Babyface

In spite of its compact size, the Babyface offers comprehensive connections: two mic inputs on XLR connectors, line outputs (on XLR connectors as well), MIDI in/out on 5-pin DIN connectors, and a headphones minijack output (which can also be used as line out). All connections are routed through the breakout cable, linked to the Babyface via a 25-pin D-Sub connector, similar to the ones on VGA graphic cards. On the interface itself you have an instrument input, which replaces the second mic input when activated via the TotalMix FX software, and a second phones out which is electrically linked to the first one. This means that the maximum output volume decreases when two headphones are connected at the same time, and also that both outputs deliver the same audio signal. In other words, you can’t send different mixes to the headphones. You’ll also find an ADAT Toslink input and output, which is a rather nice surprise considering the size and price of the interface. The ADAT option allows the user to connect an external converter and add 8 in/out channels. Nice! Finally, the interface features a connector for an external PSU (not included) and a USB cable with two connectors, in case the USB bus of your computer doesn’t provide enough current (the manufacturer states that the Babyface requires 300 mA).

RME Audio Babyface

On the top panel you’ll find some LEDs and buttons to control certain parameters without having to use the TotalMix FX software. The jog wheel allows you to control the gain of both analog inputs (simultaneously or separately), the volume of the main line outputs or the phones out level. You can select the mode (In, Out or Phone) using the select buttons underneath the jog wheel. A simple click on the jog wheel allows you to activate the dim function (temporary volume reduction) while in Out or Phone mode. The last LED shows the sync status of the digital clock. The source of the clock can be internal or external (via ADAT and S/PDIF).

Two 10-segment LED meters show the level at the inputs or outputs, which is a very valuable feature considering the size of the interface. Usually, manufacturers use only one or two LEDs for similar products… Well done RME!

Now, let’s take a look at the software package included…

Conclusion

RME succeeded in launching a compact and rugged interface with remarkable sound quality. At about $750, this baby provides two quality mic preamps and converters, ADAT in/out, a jog wheel, a transport bag, and a pair of nice-looking VU-meters. Add TotalMix FX —the virtual mixer that allows you to manage all 22 channels and process the signals (EQ, filter, reverb, and echo)— to the package and you get the best mobile audio interface on the market. It obviously has some drawbacks, like the poor precision of the gain controls, the fact that the two headphones outputs are not independent and the sturdiness of the jog wheel, but nothing is perfect in this world…

Advantages:

  • Quality of the preamps and converters
  • ADAT input and output
  • TotalMix FX with EQ, reverb and echo
  • 10-segment LED level meters
  • Size (it does matter!)
  • Metal housing
  • USB powered
  • Convenient jog wheel and buttons
  • Nice transport bag
  • Xmas is coming soon

Drawbacks:

  • Input gain control in 3 dB steps
  • Will the plastic jog wheel survive over the years?
  • The two headphone outputs are not independent
  • I have to send it back

To read the full detailed article see:  RME Babyface Review

March 25, 2010

[MUSIK MESSE 2010] – RME – Babyface

For all Musikmesse news, videos and coverage see here:  Musikmesse 2010

December 31, 2009

Zoom R16: All-Rounder

Filed under: audio interface — Tags: , , , , , , — audiofanzine @ 7:38 am

Zoom R16 Review

DAW systems are good but you don’t always have a computer by when you feel the rush to record music. Mini studios were created for that purpose: they are practical solutions but not very comprehensive nor ergonomic. That’s why Zoom launched the R16, an hybrid tool you can use as digital audio interface, controller and standalone mini studio. Let’s take a look at the result…

Zoom R16The R16 seeks to reconcile two different worlds: DAW fans who are willing to bear bugs and system crashes to get the utmost versatility and ease of use computer systems provide, and mini studio fans who enjoy integrated, reliable and compact systems at the cost of ease of use and expandability. So, the target user of the R16 is a half nomad, half sedentary musician who needs an audio interface/MIDI controller for his computer in order to comfortably mix and fine-tune his songs at home and a fully standalone and easy transportable recording system. First things first, so let’s begin by unpacking this two-headed beast…

The first impression is good. The white and gray finish provide it a sleek look and the plastic seems sturdy. Its lightness is surprising.  That’s a good point for people planning to take the R16 everywhere with them. This compact interface has nine faders but is slim enough to fit in any backpack. It’s obviously much more bulkier than a portable recorder, like M-Audio’s MicroTrack II or Zoom’s H2, but it offers incomparable recording possibilities! It reminds me a lot of digital integrated studios from Tascam, Roland, Korg, or… Zoom! The plastic buttons and faders feel a bit toyish but you can’t really expect more for the price. Do watch out for the faders because they get loose pretty easily. The R16 is sold with Cubase LE 4, a 1GB SD card and an external PSU. You can also use six AA batteries for 4.5 hours of life (according to the manufacturer’s specifications).

Now let’s take a closer look…

Conclusion

Zoom strikes a decisive blow offering hybrid technology at a very affordable price. Surely many musicians looking for a portable 16-track recorder, an audio interface and a MIDI controller will enjoy the R16. The R16’s main advantage is that it’s a real standalone product with effects, mics, SD card reader, tuner, and metronome. Nevertheless, we wish it had more headphones or line outputs because It is impossible to provide different monitor mixes to several musicians, forcing you to buy an additional headphone amplifier. The fact that only two mic preamps have phantom power, the headphones and master output level controls are on the rear panel and the documentation doesn’t describe sound card and MIDI controller applications enough might annoy some. But considering the price, such details won’t keep you from trying to get your hands on it. Hats off Mr. Zoom!

Advantages:

  • Three different and complementary applications
  • Eight inputs on XLR-1/4″ combo connectors
  • Battery operation option
  • Effects by the dozen
  • Incredibly light
  • Four-segment LED level meter per track
  • Nice price
  • Nice design

Drawbacks:

  • Only one stereo out
  • Rather ineffective tuner
  • Obsolete ergonomics
  • Average quality of the preamps and some effects
  • MIDI controller application totally ignored in the user’s manual

To read the full detailed review see:  Zoom R16 Review

April 2, 2009

Musikmesse 2009: Cakewalk V-Studio 100

Cakewalk presents their new V-Studio 100 at Musikmesse 2009.

cakewalk

For more Musikmesse videos and news visit Audiofanzine Musikmesse

March 23, 2009

Line 6 POD Studio UX2: The Test

Back in Black
Line 6 POD Studio UX2: The Test

Well known for its guitar amp simulators, Line 6 has recently updated its Toneport range of audio interfaces, and renamed it POD Studio while they were at it. Let’s take a look at the new UX2 and see what changes have been made.

POD studio UX2

At around $200, there are many interfaces that are likely to attract beginner home-studio owners. Brands like PreSonus, M-Audio, Lexicon, E-MU, Alesis, Tascam, and Novation usually offer more or less the same thing, technically speaking, both in terms of features and quality. Within this context, Line 6 was able to differentiate itself with its Toneport range, whose success was based on its look, and especially the promise of giving access to the POD’s famous amp modeling through GearBox software. You never change a winning combination, so after a few variations of this basic concept (See the test of the UX-8), the time was ripe to update the TonePort GX, UX1, UX2, which were renamed for the occasion to POD Studio GX, UX1 and UX2. The difference between these respective models remains the same: POD Studio GX is geared at guitarists and/or bassists with only one instrument input, while the UX1 and UX2, which also have mic inputs, are designed to be more general purpose devices and therefore target home-studios. The UX1 is a product that could interest tight budgets (around $150) but which would soon show its limitations, since it only has one microphone input, which in addition doesn’t have phantom power (forget about stereo micing, and especially forget about using condenser mics). For this test, we’ll be taking a look at the UX2, which is much more comprehensive and sold at the very aggressive price of $190.

Now let’s take a closer look…

Conclusion

Even if it doesn’t really change much on the hardware side compared to the TonePort, the POD Studio UX2 interface remains, for around $190, one of the best gear choices a beginner could make, provided he/she doesn’t need a MIDI connection. It’s stable, efficient, and easy to use and has one of the best software bundles in this price range, thanks to the presence of POD Farm which makes it particularly attractive for guitarists.

Ease of use.
Stability.
GearBox changing to POD Farm.
POD Farm, Live Lite, and Reason Adapted: a generous bundle.
Excellent value for money.

POD Farm’s lack of flexibility.
No MIDI connection.
Plastic hull.

To read the full detailed article see:  Line 6 POD Studio UX2 Review

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