AF’s Weblog

May 28, 2012

Yamaha FS740SFM Review

To read the full detailed article with sound samples see:  Yamaha FS740SFM Review

The sun is shining and the air is warm. Nice weather to sit down on the terrace, open the cardboard box and there it is… It’s small, it’s new and it’s beautiful! Its half-jumbo size in vintage sunburst finish recalls the Gibson LG01 from the 50’s and 60’s, clandestine bars, cigar smoke, and blues players. It’s time to stop staring at it and put my hands on it.

Description

Yamaha FS740SFM

It feels very pleasant. The frets are not too thick and make chord playing much easier. The Nato neck with faded finish feels very smooth.

It’s thin, round but not too thick, which is convenient for people with small hands and women. The guitar is provided with premium anti-rust Yamaha strings that are ideal for sweaty hands. The rosewood fingerboard features small pearly dots that emphasize the slim shape of the neck with standard scale length (650 mm / 25.6″).

So, what is Nato?

Nato comes from the Malay “kavy o”, which means hard. This is a sacred wood from Madagascar that can also be found in Hawaii and in South Carolina, where our Yamaha guitar comes from. The wood is similar to mahogany but it is more flexible. In the USA, it’s called eastern mahogany. It is frequently used for guitar and ukulele manufacturing. Unfortunately, it reacts badly to temperature changes, so it’s not recommended to play it outdoors on a cold winter evening and then go back home and put it next to the chimney fire.

The guitar is equipped with sealed lubricated tuners. They are not awesome but stay in tune.

The small body matches different styles of playing. The instrument is rather light and its shape naturally fits the body in sitting position. The lacquer has been properly laid on. The rosette with thin abalone inlays and the small turtle scale pickguard give a classy look to the instrument. Aesthetically speaking it is the mix of two different influences: vintage body and modern neck with satin finish, which is quite pleasant.

Now let’s take a closer look…

And How About When Standing Up?

Yamaha FS740SFM

Since I like instruments with king-size body, I usually play sitting down. But considering the compact size of this Yamaha, I took a strap and stood up. It feels pretty good since it’s light and not bulky — almost like holding an electric guitar. You can move your body and dance without the fear of hitting something. But then suddenly hit me and made me sad: I can’t plug it into my amp. Of course, it’s not such a big problem because it is very loud and it can be equipped with a piezo pickup.

As a conclusion, I would say this is a very good acoustic guitar in terms of manufacturing and finish quality. The instrument is available in three versions: natural, vintage cherry sunburst and vintage sunburst. It’s a pity that the guitar is sold without a gigbag. The instrument will fulfill the needs of both beginners and experienced musicians. Its playing comfort and loudness give you a lot of flexibility, which is what most people expect from an acoustic guitar, right? We all want a guitar we can play anywhere, anytime to write new songs and play music just for fun.

Advantages: 
  • Guitar build
  • Powerful sound
  • Versatility
  • Value for money
Drawbacks:
  • No gigbag
  • Some people will find the sound too crystal-clear

To read the full detailed article with sound samples see:  Yamaha FS740SFM Review

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November 15, 2010

27 Acoustic Guitars Tried and Tested

Whenever you choose a guitar you might first fall in love with appearances, but also, and above all, you cherish its sound character. Six-string fans sometimes don’t have the opportunity to listen to many instruments under good conditions. AudioFanzine is well aware of that and decided to record 27 guitars using first-class gear…

Welcome to the big acoustic demo trial-a-thon!  Thanks to your favorite website (that’s Audiofanzine of course 😉 , you can now listen to 27 acoustic guitars played in finger picking style and with a pick: from the most prestigious instruments to the most affordable, all body shapes, famous and renowned models as well as runner-ups.

Everything was recorded and filmed at the facilities of the “Rock & Chanson” music school. We used a pair of DPA 4011 (cardioid, large-diaphragm condenser) microphones, one pointing to the 12th fret and the second one to the bridge, plus a DPA 4006 (omnidirectional, large-diaphragm condenser) microphone as room mic. Both DPA 4011s were connected to an al.so MP-2 preamp while the DPA 4006 fed an al.so MP-1 preamp. The audio interface used was an RME FireFace 800. The signal wasn’t EQed or compressed.

Here is the first one of 27:

To see all 27 videos please visit:   27 Acoustic Guitars

March 19, 2010

Santa Cruz 1929 Series 000 Acoustic Guitar

To see more great guitar gear videos visit us here at our video vault!

March 15, 2010

VOX AGA70 Acoustic Guitar Amplifier

To see more great guitar gear videos visit us here at our video vault!

February 18, 2010

[NAMM 2010] Martin GPCPA1 – Performing Artist Series Grand Performance Cutaway

Watch this and other videos/news from NAMM 2010 here.

February 15, 2010

[NAMM 2010] Martin LX Jimmy Buffett

Watch this and other videos/news from NAMM 2010 here.

February 8, 2010

[NAMM 2010] Fender Dick Dale Signature Malibu SCE Guitar

Watch this and other videos/news from NAMM 2010 here.

February 2, 2010

[NAMM 2010] Guild D55 Made in USA Guitar

Watch this and other videos/news from NAMM 2010 here.

February 1, 2010

[NAMM 2010] Rainsong BI-WS100N2 Acoustic Guitar

Watch this and other videos/news from NAMM 2010 here.

January 20, 2010

Best of NAMM 2010: The Top 11

The Audio & Musical Gear that Made the Show

As the dust is settling in Anaheim, and the post-buzz is gathering wind, us here at Audiofanzine present to you our Top 11 gear picks from NAMM 2010. Why 11? Well, it’s one louder isn’t it?

With the hundreds of new products revealed and displayed last week at NAMM 2010, it is quite a battle for manufacturers fighting for attention space in the minds of consumers and partners.  It is always a challenge, and everyone of course has their favorite category, brand or particular gear need that directs their attention to this booth or that piece of hot news.  It is also extremely difficult to say hands down- this is the most innovative product to come out because invariable each product can only fairly compete within its own category.  Furthermore, like I said innovation is the outcome of a particular unfulfilled need, and not everyone will share this need.  Some products at the end are not groundbreaking but are just ‘cool’.  And that’s cool too.

Hence, without further ado, the editors of Audiofanzine present to you the Top 11 picks from NAMM 2010, in no particular order- as the products present a mixture of categories that cannot be compared.

Teenage Engineering OP-11.  Teenage Engineering OP-1:

It may look like a Japanese toy, but the OP-1 is the all-in-one portable Synthesizer, Sampler and Controller. With additional features like the FM Radio and a G-Force sensor for pitch and bend effects. Beside a creative approach to sequencing with multiple choice of sequencers, it also has a built-in Tape feature.  Check out all juicy details on Teenage Engineering .  This one is a keeper.

Pearl E-Pro2.  Pearl E-Kit:

What makes the E-Pro Live drumset truly different from other electronic drumsets, the company says, is the “real feel and response from the pads”. Pearl’s Tru-Trac Electronic Heads feature dual-zones that reproduce all of the intricacies the drummer is used to hearing when playing an acoustic drum. The smooth coating on the heads makes moving from drum to drum fast and easy, Pearl says. And of course, let’s not forget the obvious: the real sizes of the drums. The set features 10″, 12″ and 14″ toms, a 14″ snare drum, and a 20″ bass drum. Say goodbye to 8″ practice pads.

Taylor Baritone 8 Strings3.  Taylor Baritone 8 Strings:

Taylor decided to add 2 octave strings to each of the A and D strings. The resulting 8-string baritone GS complements the baritone’s lower tonal range, adding a touch of upper-octave brightness without too much 12-string jangle. The result is a guitar with great tonal range, perfect for walking basslines and rich melodies.  How does it sound?  Simply divine.

Want to see the rest of the list?  Visit us here:  NAMM Top 11

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