AF’s Weblog

June 14, 2012

Top 10 Things That Can Never Be Taught Often Enough In Audio

Filed under: Live Sound — Tags: , , , , — audiofanzine @ 8:48 am

10. Musicians feel most comfortable and play best when they hear what they need to hear on the stage. Of course, the experienced monitor guys and recording guys already know this. But it’s something for those less experienced to think about. No, it’s not about how much power you have or what kind of monitor wedges. It’s about psychology.

And I think it’s true that if you become good at monitors and understand how to please musicians, you are 90 percent there towards becoming a good mix engineer.

Sure, the last 10 percent might be the “magic” but you can’t make magic without the basics.

9.  Sound travels at 1,130 feet per second, at sea level, at 68 degrees F and 4 percent relative humidity. This is important because if you understand how sound propagates, you’ll automatically know more about microphone placement, setting delay towers, and things like delaying the mains to the backline. And you should also know that the speed changes with temperature, humidity, and altitude. (If you don’t, it’s a good idea to look it up.)

8.  The Inverse Square Law. You know, the thing about a doubling of the distance from the source means that the acoustic power is cut by 1/4, right? This applies all over the place, from mic technique to loudspeaker arrays. It relates to how much power you will need from the power amplifiers.

For instance, if you normally cover an audience at 20 to 60 feet from your stacks, but for the next gig, the audience will be 40 to 100 feet away, how much more power will you need to maintain about the same acoustic power? About four times as much! Maybe think about delay stacks (see #9).

Let’s see some more pointers…

2. Grounding. Let’s not mince words here: this is a subject you need to understand. If you have more than one path to ground in your audio system, and the resistance to ground is different between them, you will have problems with hum and buzz.

Related to this is how you terminate your connections, especially if any parts of the system go back and forth from balanced to unbalanced terminations.

It’s also a good idea to learn the sonic signatures of different kinds of hum and buzz to therefore speed up your troubleshooting when the time comes. This is because some types of buzz are not related to grounding problems, but instead may be power supply issues, for instance.

1.  Gain structure, baby. This is the main one, the real deal. The thing that, if you can’t learn, or don’t understand or have forgotten, will get you into more trouble than anything else. There will be more noise and/or more distortion in the system unless you get this right. And there will be less gain before feedback, too.

So here’s the deal: every input and every device has an optimum range of levels it wants to see or wants to work with. If you’re feeding something a signal that is too low, you have to make this up somewhere, and therefore you’ll be bringing up the noise more than it should be. And that noise will be in your signal from then on.

Oh, sure, there are noise reduction devices you can use, but why do that when proper gain structure will take care of it for you? And really, we should use the least processing possible to get the job done because things sound better that way.

Alternatively, if you an input or a mix bus is fed too much signal, headroom will run out, which means you’re adding distortion. And this, also, cannot be removed later. Artistically adding distortion via plug-ins, hot-rodded guitar amps or certain outboard gear can be cool. Adding it by slamming your inputs or your mix bus is not cool.

For instance, if a wireless microphone output can be set at line level, but you set it to mic level and connect it to a mic input on your mixer, you will have more noise than if you connect the line output to the line input. Why? Because essentially you’re padding down the output then boosting it back up again with a high-gain mic preamp.

Sure, sometimes you might want to put the signal through a transformer or other “good” distortion device—just be aware that from a gain structure point of view, this is not ideal.

OK, that’s the list. If you’ve already mastered these things, great! You’re probably doing better mixes, with more gain before feedback, better coverage and happier musicians than those who don’t. But please don’t rest on your laurels – get out there and learn as much as you can.

Those of us going to your shows will know it when we hear it!

To read the full detailed article see:  Top 10 Things That Can Never be Taught Often Enough in Audio

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