AF’s Weblog

October 5, 2010

Akai APC 20 Review

With the APC40, a control surface fully dedicated to Ableton Live, Akai created an extremely successful tool, so the launch of the APC20 comes as no surprise: an APC40 amputated of its right section and sold at half the price, to beat all competitors.

Because Akai has serious competitors: also targeting Ableton users, Novation didn’t try to compete with the APC40 on the features front but rather, on the price side, with its more basic Launchpad (only pads, no faders nor rotary controls) for under (the psychological price barrier of) $200. It wasn’t a surprise to see that anyone who didn’t have the money for the big Akai controller jumped at the Launchpad. This was enough to get on the nerves of  MPC’s inventor who decided to answer with the APC20 available for less than $200. Let’s have a closer look…

No Surprises

Akai APC20

Once you take it out of its big box, the APC20 makes a quite good impression. Made out of metal, it’s neither too heavy to be transported in a backpack nor too light to keep steady on a table (thanks to four wide rubber feet). Plastic is only used for the pads, the switches, the faders, the encoder, and the removable sides of the housing. The latter are held by six screws and thus can be easily removed for rack mounting purposes. We can easily imagine it between two turntables and a small mixer to rock the dance floor with hot loops.

The APC20 features eight channels, each of them with the following controls (from bottom to top): fader, “Record Arm” button, “Solo/Cue” button (for routing the solo track to the monitoring bus), and “Activator” button (for channel on/off). Next to the eight tracks, on the right, a fader controls the master volume while an encoder adjusts the monitoring level.

Above this section, nine pads give access to the main controls: play, stop, record, MIDI overdub, left/right/up/down buttons to navigate within the tracks and the scenes, and “Note Mode” to determinate the operation of the 8×5 pads on the top section of the APC 20. Although their main use is as clip triggers, they can also be used as a “MIDI keyboard” in Note mode, in which case each pad is assigned to a note. Even though it can’t replace a real master keyboard if you want to play melodic instruments, this feature is very convenient to program Ableton’s Drum Rack on the fly.

Now let’s take a closer look…

Conclusion

Yes, the APC40 is much more comprehensive than the APC20! But if you have only $200 for a Live controller, the APC20 has only one competitor in the form of the Novation Launchpad. The latter is less expensive but doesn’t have any faders, which makes it less interesting. However, its larger pads make it more comfortable to use. The perfect product doesn’t exist, even if the numerous pros of both competitors provide unprecedented comfort of use with Live.

Advantages:

  • More comfort of use with Live
  • Plug and play
  • Attractive price
  • Manufacturing quality
  • The faders offer a small advantage over the Launchpad

Drawbacks:

  • It would be better with rotary controls, like on the APC40…
  • Backlit pads hardly readable in bright environments

To read the full detailed article see: Akai APC 20 Review

1 Comment »

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    Comment by nemons — November 3, 2010 @ 1:42 pm


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