AF’s Weblog

October 6, 2009

Music Notation Basics

Filed under: Instructional articles — Tags: , , , — audiofanzine @ 8:11 am
Learning to Read Music
It’s never too late to learn how to read music, and with a little practice and tenacity, the basics can be learned quite quickly. And because knowing how to read and write music still has its benefits and uses, no matter what style of music you’re into, this article has been put together to present the most important and prominent of these basics.

Table Of Contents:

NotesDuration Values, Tuplets, Beams, Note Names, Octave

Accidentals Sharp, Flat, Natural, Double Accidentals

The Staff Ledger Lines

Measures/BarsBarlines

ClefsG Clef, F Clef, C Clef

Rests

Time Signatures

Key Signatures

Notes

Micro Spider

They represent a sound’s duration and pitch. The duration is represented by the type of note head ( the oval part of a note), and/or it’s stem and flag. Pitch is represented by the note’s position on the staff. The higher the note on the staff, the higher the pitch, and vice versa.

Duration Values

1 whole note = 2 half notes = 4 quarter notes = 8 eighth notes =

16 sixteenth notes = 32 – thirty-second = 64 Sixty-fourth notes etc.

In Britain the names are different for these notes values:

whole note = semibreve, half note = minim, quarter note = crotchet, eighth note = quaver, sixteenth note = semiquaver, thirty-second = demisemiquaver, Sixty-fourth note = hemidemisemiquaver etc.

Now let’s explore other elements of music notation…

To read the full detailed article see:  Music Notation Basics

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: