AF’s Weblog

December 29, 2008

Test: M-Audio BX8a Deluxe Review

After having updated its entire range of audio interfaces, M-Audio now looks to update its monitors, especially in the wake of their excellent high-level EXS66 monitors. These updates have had great results on the small Studiophile AV40, so let’s see what’s happened to the BX8a, for which a Deluxe version was recently released.

M-Audio BX8a Deluxe

The BX8a Deluxe monitors are equipped, as their name suggests, with an 8″ boomer. The latter, made of curved Kevlar, is paired with a 1-1/4” natural silk, waveguide-loaded tweeter for a frequency range extending, according to the manufacturer, from 30 Hz to 24 kHz … In terms of power, these monitors are said to deliver 130 Watts. This means bi-amplification of 70 watts for the bass amplifier and 60 watts for the treble, which is more than sufficient for nearfield monitors. As for their looks, there’s nothing special to mention. Even if they’re not as original looking as the EXS66 monitors, the sober design, black matte finish, and the little blue power LED all look very nice. The well-adjusted ensemble and weight (26.4 lbs./unit) complete the impression of solidity and quality.

You might be a little surprised by the absence of features on the back of the monitors. In addition to the On/Off switch, the power cord jack, and TRS (Jack 6.35) and XLR inputs to connect the monitors to your audio system, there’s only a volume knob. No filter, no EQ, no boost: just a volume control with a middle position that’s not serrated. So it’s not possible to adjust the response curve of these monitors to adapt them to the room in which they’ll be used. Also you should be aware that there’s a vent at the rear of the enclosure: you will have to keep them a safe distance from the wall or it will affect the bass. This is a defect that was already present in the BX8a and which hasn’t been corrected in this version. In short, make sure you have enough space …

Conclusion

M-Audio BX8a Deluxe

Well-built and elegant looking, the BX8a Deluxe are nevertheless not perfect. Between the vent at the rear and a tendency to over-compensate the bass, we wonder why they didn’t include more than just volume settings in terms of adjustments. But compared to other speakers in the same price range, they clearly have their advantages. You’ll particularly like the width of their spectrum, particularly the highs which are very convincing. These latest M-Audio monitors have an excellent value and are likely to interest those who want to make their debut into the difficult science of mixing. Admittedly, there are better monitors, but more expensive,…even much more expensive.

Design.
Lows, and very detailed highs.
Pleasant to work with.
Excellent value for the money.

Lows too prominent .
Almost no sound settings.

Read the full M-Audio BX8a Deluxe Review.

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2 Comments »

  1. Oh My goodness.. Um,, rear porting a speaker enclosure is NOT a defect.. Whether a box is front or rear ported, or not vented at all, we need to make sure they are away from the wall. How do you reach the conclusion that this is a defect?

    Ivan………………..

    Comment by Ivan — June 9, 2009 @ 6:01 pm

  2. I concur with Ivan here….rear porting is an inconvenience at best,for those with no acoustical treatment in confined spaces.
    Rear porting has worked fine for the M-Audio CX series,Genelec,JBL & others.
    That being said,it’s the overall cabinet materials,components & such,that make for a clean bass performance and no studio should be without acoustical treatment anyhow.

    Comment by Elwood — June 9, 2010 @ 2:12 am


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