AF’s Weblog

April 26, 2010

[Musik Messe 2010] Two Notes Torpedo VM 202

To see more gear video demos see:  Audiofanzine Video Vault

July 17, 2009

B-band – Model T35 Guitar Preamp

B-Band presents their new T-35 guitar preamp, featuring an LCD chromatic tuner, three-band EQ and drop-in installation, partnered with the B-Band UST 22R or 29R pickup. Don’t miss the guitar playin…

To see more exclusive video demos visit Audiofanzine Videos.

July 15, 2009

Rupert Neve Designs – Fidelice Quad

Rupert Neve Designs presents their Fidelice Quad pre microphone preamplifier which is based on the class A and high-voltage circuit topology of the 5088 mixer.

To see more exclusive video demos visit Audiofanzine Videos.

April 25, 2009

Making a Studio Pt.1

Studio Considerations

The magic of the recording studio has often mystified even the most seasoned professionals. With all the knobs, switches and buttons on various gear and large format consoles, no wonder confusion sets in to most non-techies. Many people, especially artists, composers, producers, and engineers, will end up putting together their own studio for writing and preproduction, with some eventually deciding to take the plunge and create a full-fledged recording complex that is capable of recording major albums. This series of articles will try to shed some light on the considerations to take into account when making a studio, be it a small home studio or a professional recording studio.

Ouverture

Is bigger better?

Is size important? Some may say it is so but this is not always the case. The dimensions of the studio are very important. A room too large may become over-reverberant or full of unwanted echoes. A room too small may sound tight and unnatural. It is important that the room size and room sound is relevant to the type of music you are recording. You don’t want to go into a very small tight room to record BIG rock drums. Although, big room sounds can be achieved by adding external reverb effects to simulate rooms at a later time when necessary.

It is best to find the room that suits the sound you are trying to achieve from the beginning of the recording process. The smaller the room, the smaller and tighter the sound will be; this is not necessarily a bad thing. Small tight rooms can be good for vocals, guitars and percussion if you are going for a tight clean sound. Larger rooms have more air for the sound to travel in, so it will be in fact a bigger more open sound. The sound has a longer travel time for the sound wave to move, therefore the reflection from the walls will take longer to bounce back creating a bigger more spacious sound. The decision of size and sound has to be made early on before the recording starts. One advantage that a larger room will have is the ability to be scaled down by closing up the room using modular baffles or gobos (go betweens). Gobos are structures that are partitions, that help to block sound by placing them in between the musicians, instruments, and microphones. Placing the gobos around the microphone at a close distance will help a large room with too much ambiance sound smaller. This will eliminate the reflections coming off of the walls that are further away.

Ouverture

Small rooms can produce big heavy tight sounds with the absence of the decay from the reverb that is caused from big rooms. Sometimes a large room can sound like it’s washed out, or far away. With a good engineer any room can sound amazing with a little adjusting. A poor sounding room can be manipulated to sound good, although it requires much more work and time. Deciding on the proper room size for your needs is critical to the sounds that get re-produced. This will highly dictate the type of sound the microphones will pick up.

Clapping your hands in a room can give a good representation of what a room will sound like. The reflection coming off the walls will be picked up by a simple hand clap. The true test is to try out some instruments or vocals and position them in various sections of the room until reaching the optimum sound quality. If one side of the room sounds bad try a different spot or move around into a corner until the sound is improved.

Experimenting with different sections of the room also keeps the sound fresh when recording many instruments. If the acoustic guitars are recorded in the center of the room, when the time comes to record the electric guitars you may try recording them in a corner of the room for a different room sound. This gives clarity on the final mix creating separation and providing more distinction on various sounds.

If you are starting your own studio, remember that the bigger the studio the higher amount the bills will be. The benefit is that larger studios can charge more for their studio rates.

Now let’s take a closer look…

Check List: Part 3

Plan de groupeA Sony CD Recorder

CD RECORDER

Records and plays back compact discs. Gives the ability to record stereo mixes and playback these mixes on other CD players. CD standard for consumer playback is a sample rate of 16 bit and a sampling rate of 44.1kHz. Sony, Tascam, Alesis, and Yamaha all make good studio CD recorders.

Plan de groupeStuder 24 Track Analog Tape Machine

TAPE MACHINES

Recording machines that use analog or digital tape for recording and playback of music. Some purists in sound recording prefer the sound of analog tape. There are many digital tape machines used for recording both music and video.

CABLING

Literally miles of various cabling could be needed for a single studio. Common cables in sound reproduction are XLR balanced mic cables and Unbalanced 1/4 inch instrument cables.

MONITORS / AMPS

Speakers in the studio are referred to as Monitors. Powerful clean amps are needed to run monitors. Many monitors are self powered, which means that they have built in amplifiers. Monitors usually consist of high frequency tweeters, low frequency woofers and cabinets that contain the speakers and components.

Plan de groupeActive Studio Monitors

HEADPHONES / DISTRIBUTION

By using a set of earphones this allows communication between the control room and the studio, also allows pre-recorded tracks to be heard during the overdubbing process. Headphones are also referred to as cans.

INSTRUMENTS / KEYBOARDS / DRUMS / GUITARS

These are more of the tools of the craft. You may have all the best studio gear in the world, but if the instruments sound bad you are starting in the wrong place. Anything could be considered an instrument if it makes noise that could possibly be recorded on a record.

AMPLIFIERS

This is often referred to as an amp. Amps increase the amplitude or volume of electrical signals from sound waves. These are used in powering speakers. Guitar and Bass amps can be used for many other applications such as running a vocal or snare drum through them.

Plan de groupe

MICROPHONE STANDS

A wide variety of sizes and styles are needed for a proper studio. The mic stand helps to get the microphone placed properly for the best sound quality possible.

STUDIO FURNITURE

There are many types of racks and furniture designed to hold consoles and outboard gear. The interior decoration of the studio completely sets the vibe of the working environment.

To Be Continued…

That’s the end of part one. For part two, we’ll be discussing electricity, A/C requirements, separate rooms, location, and more…

To read the full detailed article see Making a Studio Part 1

February 27, 2009

Video Demo: Lexicon I-Onix FW810S

Randy Garrett from Lexicon presents the I-Onix FW810S external firewire audio interface.

To watch all NAMM 2009 video demos visit us on Audiofanzine NAMM 2009.


February 19, 2009

NAMM 2009: Video Demo Burl Audio B1D and B2

Filed under: Microphones, namm 2009, Preamp — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — audiofanzine @ 2:10 pm

Rich Williams from Burl Audio shows us his new B1D microphone preamp and B2 analog to digital converter.

To watch all NAMM 2009 video demos visit us on Audiofanzine NAMM 2009.

February 18, 2009

NAMM 2009: Video Demo Radikal Technologies Pre GTK

Presentation of the Radikal Technologies guitar preamplifier, the Pre GTK.

To watch all NAMM 2009 video demos visit us on Audiofanzine NAMM 2009.

February 9, 2009

NAMM 2009: Video Demo True Systems P-Solo Ribbon

Presentation of the new P-Solo Ribbon preamp for ribbon and dynamic microphones from True Systems.

To watch all NAMM 2009 video demos visit us on Audiofanzine NAMM 2009.

February 5, 2009

NAMM 2009: Video Demo Focusrite Liquid Saffire 56

Filed under: namm 2009, Preamp — audiofanzine @ 8:51 am

Presentation of the brand new Liquid Saffire 56 from Focusrite.

To watch all NAMM 2009 video demos visit us on Audiofanzine NAMM 2009.

January 29, 2009

NAMM 2009: Video Demo Empirical Labs EL9 Mike-E

Filed under: namm 2009, Preamp — Tags: , , , , , , , , — audiofanzine @ 2:30 pm

Dave Derr from Empirical Labs shows us his brand new digitally controlled solid state preamp, the EL9 Mike-E.

To watch all NAMM 2009 video demos visit us on Audiofanzine NAMM 2009.

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