AF’s Weblog

March 21, 2011

TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch Review

Vocal effects are present more than ever in modern music, but if you want special effects, you don’t give the control to the sound engineer. Loopers are also hip, especially for artists making solo performances on stage. So, when such a serious manufacturer as TC-Helicon offers a voice processor, harmonizer and looper in one single box (everything you need for a single voice, voice + guitar or voice + keyboards performance) it is worth taking a closer look at it. Let’s go!

Who is TC?

TC-Helicon is a Canadian company belonging to the TC-Group, a holding that controls several prestigious pro audio manufacturers like the very famous TC-Electronic, but also Lab.gruppen amps or Tannoy speakers… TC Group merged with Gibson in 2008. TC-Helicon specializes in voice gear, from processors to mics. Their products have a good overall quality and a rugged construction plus they sound pretty good.

The VoiceLive Touch is a variation of the VoiceLive 2 footboard, which offers more possibilities (to a certain extent) and is also 60% more expensive. The street price of the Voice Live 2 is around $800 while you can get the Voice Live Touch for only $500. And unlike the VoiceLive 2, the VoiceLive Touch includes a looper. And not a toy one.

The VoiceLive is not just a light version of its predecessor. In fact, its designers had the idea of developing a concept with a radically different user interface based on a “touch” interface. Definitely trendy, but is it a good thing? We’ll have to discuss the matter further. Let’s start discovering the unit!

Heavy Duty!

TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch

At first hand, the VoiceLive Touch gives the impression of being quite sturdy. Its heavy weight, in spite of the compact size, is responsible for that, but also the materials. The housing, except for the front panel with the touch interface, is made out of some sort of rugged rubber plastic. Why this material? Because the VoiceLive Touch’s special shape allows you to place it on a table or on a microphone stand, which is a very convenient solution to always have it at hand. The fixation system is well thought out as you can see from the pictures. However, the rear handle used to fix the unit to a microphone stand makes connections a bit harder, even if it hides the connectors from the audience. You can’t have everything, right? Long jacks can be problematic.

Although the overall design of the VoiceLive Touch is very nice and original, the touch interface looks a bit awkward, as if it had been designed in the 80’s. In some (rare) circumstances, you’ll be dazzled by the reflections. The external PSU is the same as for many consumer products, which is hard to understand for a stage device, especially at this price. An adapter plugged into a multi-outlet power strip or an extension power cord is not exactly what you want to have or see in the middle of the stage. Luckily, the length of the cable should be enough to hide it behind a monitor speaker. I know, it’s an insignificant detail, but once you discover its features you’ll agree with me that such a product deserves better.

An All-Rounder?

The features of the VoiceLive Touch are very comprehensive. Just take a look:

  • Voice effects processor
  • Automatic tuning correction (so you can sing in tune)
  • Harmonizer (to add a choir to your voice)
  • Basic guitar effect
  • Looper
  • Phrase sampler

Phew!

TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch

Let’s just mention the tuning corrector briefly: it offers a single “strength” control (in %). If you sing like an angel you’ll set it to 0 if, but if you are a shower singer you’ll probably have to set it to 100. As always with such tools, the performance looses its natural expression with higher settings. In extreme cases you’ll even experience bizarre results (like the famous “Cher” effect). But it’s a very handy tool: it is not easy to sing in tune with choirs and effects added to your own voice. The tuning corrector makes up for this. Since it is global, we prefer to use the one included with some effects for presets that require it. Do note that the samples were recorded without tuning correction (I guess you’ll hear it anyway!).

The processor includes six effect categories: harmonizer, modulation (chorus, flanger, …), delay, reverb, “double,” and “FX,” which includes different effects (only one can be used at a time). The effect chain has independent sections you can switch on/off individually (like separate stompboxes). Each section offers several (quite) basic parameters. Let’s take the delay as an example: you can choose from 18 different delay types, set the effect amount added to the mix, the stereo width, and the tempo. And that’s it. No direct feedback nor damping nor feedback delay time: just select the delay type number to change to a new sound. The 18 delays cover a wide range of effects but don’t allow the precise processing you get with standard parameters. Below you will see that that wasn’t the goal of the VoiceLive Touch.

TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch

You also get a “lead level” setting for each effects section. It allows you to attenuate your voice when only that effect is active. It is similar to a standard dry/wet setting but the fact that it activates only when no other effect is on allows you to create (very) interesting special effects.

Some sections offer more settings, but some are very basic. Besides the “lead level,” the reverb provides you only with a send level (routing to the mix) and a selector to choose among 30 reverb types, which is quite a lot considering that they all have different colors and duration. This approach is good because of its simplicity (some people don’t know what all parameters of a delay or a reverb are for), but it can be frustrating for people who are used to tweaking effects. Especially given that the effects are identified only by a number rather than a name, which makes it difficult to find them and often requires you to try all of them.

Thus, fine tuning your presets with the VoiceLive Touch demands quite some time before going on stage. Even though most factory presets sound very good, they require you to at least adjust levels.

Now let’s take a close look…

Conclusion

While I was very enthusiastic about the concept in the beginning, I ended up with mixed feelings because the VoiceLive Touch has some excellent features as well as some irritating ones. The touch interface didn’t quite convince me. In fact, I was surprised by some design faults, as well as by some very nice ideas and some complexities. But the VoiceLive Touch has many advantages too: besides its perfect sound quality, some very intelligent features and its versatility (I couldn’t mention many of its applications in this review), it has a very powerful harmonizer and an excellent looper. Both are crucial in the decision to buy the unit. When I was a solo performer (voice+guitar), I would have been delighted by such a product.

Advantages:

  • Original concept
  • Clever features
  • Irreproachable manufacturing quality
  • Very professional sound
  • Excellent harmonizer and effects
  • Awesome looper
  • Affordable optional footboard

Drawbacks:

  • Questionable “full touch” interface
  • No possibility to tweak effects live on stage
  • Improvable ergonomics
  • Lousy display
  • Settings sometimes too complex

To read the full multimedia article please see:  TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch Review

About these ads

3 Comments »

  1. Guitar Effects Pedals vs Rack Mount Guitar Effects Processors…

    If you play electric guitar or even a fan, you probably wondered how your favorite artist is “sound” in one of his favorite music. There is an incredible variety of guitar effects processors available today and find the right combination of…

    Trackback by vahnseifer.com — January 20, 2012 @ 11:14 pm

  2. I love the sound of the demo and all of the features included. I love the reverb, the Harmonizer and looper for vocals AND guitar all in one unit. The issue I have is that it looks WAY too tedious and would keep my hands way too busy while I’m trying to Sing AND play guitar AND manipulate the touchscreen of then unit. Any remedy?
    You mention an optional foot pedal. Whats that all about?

    Comment by James DiLorenzo — June 12, 2012 @ 3:42 pm

    • ….also my Taylor Acoustic plugs into a PA directly from 1/4 out of guitar and runs to the other end of the patch cord with an XLR and sounds extrememly good this way. The Helicon only has a 1/4 inch for guitar input. A small drawback for me…

      Comment by James DiLorenzo — June 12, 2012 @ 3:47 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Shocking Blue Green Theme. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: